June 20, 2007

Emmett Till Unsovled Civil Rights Crime Act--Justice Delayed

Statement on The Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act
June 14, 2007

In November 2005, the Federal Bureau of Investigation announced that it had concluded its 18-month investigation into the reopened case of the 1955 murder of Emmett Till. The FBI’s report, not yet public, has been forwarded to the Mississippi District Attorney’s Office for the Fourth District for review.

Senator Chris Dodd (D-CT) issued the following statement today upon the Senate Judiciary Committee’s passage of the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act, legislation that he introduced in February 2007 with Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT):

“Today, Congress came one step closer to righting the wrongs of the past and bringing to justice people who have perpetrated heinous crimes based on racial hatred. I commend Chairman Leahy and my colleagues on the Judiciary Committee for taking action on this important piece of legislation. While this bill cannot alter history or heal the wounds incurred by these senseless acts of violence, it can work to restore belief in the fairness of our justice system. I hope that the full Senate will join me in reaffirming our nation’s commitment to seek the truth and work to make equal justice a reality by passing the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act.”

The Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act would give the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) increased resources to reopen Civil Rights-era criminal cases which have gone cold by designating a Deputy Chief in the Criminal Section of the Civil Rights Division of the DOJ and a Supervisory Special Agent in the Civil Rights Unit of the FBI. These individuals will be tasked with spearheading and coordinating efforts by federal, state, and local law enforcement officers and prosecutors to bring long-time fugitives to justice. Both positions will focus on investigating and prosecuting the unsolved murder cases that occurred prior to 1970 and the Civil-rights era.

S.535 - Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act

A bill to establish an Unsolved Crimes Section in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, and an Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Investigative Office in the Civil Rights Unit of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and for other purposes.

Other Bill Titles

Official: A bill to establish an Unsolved Crimes Section in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, and an Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Investigative Office in the Civil Rights Unit of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and for other purposes. as introduced.
Short: Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act as introduced.

2/8/2007--Introduced.Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act - Establishes an Unsolved Crimes Section in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice (DOJ) and an Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Investigative Office in the Civil Rights Unit of the Federal Bureau of
Investiga tion (FBI).

Makes the Chief of the Section (Chief) and the Chief Investigator of the Office responsible for investigating violations of criminal civil rights statutes in which the alleged violation occurred before January 1, 1970 and resulted in death.

Requires: (1) consultation with state or local officials regarding venue when there has been a violation of a criminal civil rights statute that is also a violation of a state or local law; and (2) referral to the Criminal Section of the Civil Rights Division if the subject of the complaint has violated a criminal civil rights statute but the violation does not meet the requirements for the Unsolved Crimes Section. Amends the Crime Control Act of 1990 to authorize staff of an Inspector General to assist the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children by conducting reviews of inactive case files to develop recommendations for further investigations and engaging in similar activities.

Read the Entire Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act (Introduced in Senate)

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Rodrigo said...
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